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Cots

cot1Having put our cot in the loft 30 years ago ‘just in case’ we naively thought that all we needed to do was to retrieve it and clean it.  We had not realised that safety standards and cot mattress sizes had changed, and more importantly the cot had become damaged under all the junk in the loft so we had to start again.

When the babies are tiny they will probably be carried around and sleep in a moses basket or rear-facing baby car seats so you will not need a cot until they are a few months old.

 

We found we had two main options:

1. Travel cot.cot 2

These temporary, portable collapsible cots are a great option. They are easily assembled (once you know how!) and stored.  They can be moved from room to room.

In our experience, the basic ones (retail between £25 to £40) are fine if you are not moving them around too much.  Our daughter borrows our travel cot when she comes from abroad.  She tends to be continually taking and putting it up and down at friend’s houses so we have found we needed a slightly more robust travel cot

Features to look out for:

  • Height. Some come up slightly higher which can save your back if you are bending over, but which can be tricky if you are vertically challenged like us.
  • Wheels.  Some also come on wheels which can be useful but this does add to the weight
  • Newborn insert. Some cots come with a snug newborn insert which does make them more pricey.  We found that it was easier for our children to bring along their own Moses basket when the babies were this small, rather than buying a specific travel cot.
  • Mattress.  Most come with a simple thin mattress, and do remember that you’ll need to buy a separate fitted sheet for this.  Some people prefer to buy a thicker mattress to make the cot more comfortable.  However, our grandchildren have always slept fine on the basic one (and this in itself is quite handy as it means that they are flexible to sleep in pretty much any cot if needs must!).

 

2. Wooden cot.

One of these could suit you if you would like to have a permanent cot up at home.  If it’s not going to be used every day, we recommend that you look around for a good quality second hand cot, that complies with British safety standards (BSEN716),  and just buy a new mattress to fit inside it.

 

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